Fraternal Thoughts in Print!

Big news! 24 of the most-read and beloved posts from this blog have been compiled into a book, Forever Fraternity: Essays to Challenge, Celebrate and Advance the College Fraternity. Discussion questions have been added in order to make the book an educational tool as well.

Order your copy off of Amazon or Barnes and Noble. If you wish to order a quantity of 20 or more to use for a program or Greek leadership class, contact John Shertzer at johnshertzer@gmail.com for a discount.

An e-reader version will be available soon!



https://www.amazon.com/Forever-Fraternity-Challenge-Celebrate-Advance/dp/1457563460/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1531409369&sr=8-1&keywords=forever+fraternity

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Fraternity and the Fatherhood Crisis

As we approach father’s day, some sobering statistics to consider:

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 24 million children in America -- one out of every three -- live in homes without their biological father. 

7 out of 10 people agree that the physical absence of fathers from the home is the most significant family or social problem facing America.

Research shows when a child grows up in a father-absent home, he or she is...
  • Four Times More Likely to Live in Poverty
  • More Likely to Suffer Emotional and Behavioral Problems
  • More Likely to go to Prison
  • More Likely to Commit Crime
  • Seven Times More Likely to Become Pregnant as a Teen
  • More Likely to Face Abuse and Neglect
  • More Likely to Abuse Drugs and Alcohol
  • Two Times More Likely to Suffer Obesity
  • Two Times More Likely to Drop Out of High School

Only 68.1% will spend their entire childhood in an intact family and the number is decreasing.

40% of children of divorce haven’t seen their father in a year.

40.7 percent of all births are out-of-wedlock.

46% of fathers say they don’t spend enough time with their children.

39% indicate that they never read to their child.

A pew study indicated that mothers are seen as more essential for providing values/morals to their children and emotional support to their children.  (Fathers are seen as more essential for providing money.)

When asked whether fathers generally play a greater or lesser role in raising children than did fathers 20 or 30 years ago,  45% say today’s fathers play a lesser role.

Fathers are twice as likely than mothers to report that they don’t spend enough time with their children (46% vs. 23%).

Only 24% of adults say dads are doing a better job at parenthood than their own fathers. A third (34%) say they are doing a worse job than their own fathers did.


Is anyone aware of an organization that can instill in young men the character necessary to reverse these trends?  Is there an organization primed to inspire fidelity to one’s commitments? Is there any organization out there that can help young men understand the priorities that require the greatest responsibility and seriousness?  

Can one organization, or a group of organizations, be bold enough to create men of such high quality that the importance of their roles in the lives of children can never be discounted again?

I hope there is.  Our society is counting on it.







Sources:

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

If You Have a Fast Race Horse, Don't Slow Down

Updated from June 2011

Congratulations to American Pharaoh, the first triple crown winner in horse racing since 1978.  One of the most difficult feats in sports was achieved just a few days ago and hopefully you were able to witness history.

Despite American Pharaoh's success, the most well-known triple crown winner will likely always remain the 1978 winner, Secretariat. He has been the subject of books and movies, and is typically regarded as the best racehorse to have ever lived.  Part of his legend lies in how he finished the triple crown - that final race at the Belmont Stakes.


All the dramatic pieces were in place for the final race, the Belmont Stakes: the champ (Secretariat), the hyped-up challenger (a horse named Champ), and history on the line.  The typical formula (see Rocky or Remember the Titans) for these kinds of stories is that the hero fights the battle of his life, appears defeated, only to valiantly battle back to barely win, sending the crowd into a frenzy.  That wasn’t the case with Secretariat.  He blew the doors off the competition and won by thirty lengths.  It wasn’t close at all.  The outcome was decided almost immediately after the gates opened.